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TOGETHER!

LET'S TRAVEL TO LUMINO CITY

As the lights dim around the world, planes come to a standstill and movement is forbidden - Wellington Lantern Festival invites you to dive into a new and exhilarating world of vivid lights and sensory experiences as you step into the glowing metropolis that is Lumino City.

 
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Source: Department of Conservation

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SADDLEBACK

NZ Status: Endemic (only found in NZ)

Population: Estimated 650

Conservation Status (NZTCS): At Risk - Recovering

Found: Taranga (Hen) Island has the only remaining natural population; relocated populations now on offshore islands and mainland sanctuaries

Habitat: Common in coastal forest. They like tree-ferns, shrubs and native trees such as the Southern Rata

Threats: Predation

Facts:

  • The Māori name is tīeke​, for their loud, staccato-like calls

  • Has a distinctive copper ‘saddle’ on its back

  • Saddleback also called wattlebirds, for their fleshy wattles found on either side of their beak

  • There are a North Island and South Island species

  • The Saddleback are poor flyers and mostly bounce along branches or hop along the ground

  • They feed mainly on invertebrates pulled out from under bark, rotten logs, or the forest ground

 
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Source: Department of Conservation

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POWELLIPHANTA SNAIL

NZ Status: Endemic (only found in NZ)

Population: Unknown

Conservation Status (NZTCS): Threatened – Nationally Endangered

Found: Wet native forests mostly north-west Nelson and north Westland

Habitat: Lives in rich temperature rainforests buried in leaves, under logs, under tussock grasses.

Threats: Predation, habitat loss

Facts:

  • Powelliphanta superba prouseorum species can grow as big as a fist (up to 9cm across), making them one of the largest snails in the world

  • Amoung largest snails in the world

  • Eat invertebrates – mostly native earth worms and slugs

  • Lay about 5-10 eggs a year

  • Live up to 20 years

  • Shells can be brown/red/yellow/black

  • Are nocturnal

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Source: Department of Conservation

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KAKAPO

NZ Status: Endemic (only found in NZ)

Population: Only 209

Conservation Status (NZTCS): Threatened - Nationally Critical

Found: Codfish Island/Whenua Hou, Anchor Island and Te Hauturu-o-Toi/Little Barrier Island

Habitat: Use their strong claws to climb 20m high Rimu Trees

Threats: Predators, disease, genetic inbreeding, infertility

 

Facts:

  • Large, flightless, nocturnal green parrot with a distinctive owl-like face

  • Heaviest parrot species in the world and the longest-life span, estimated to reach 90 years. 

  • Herbivorous – only eat plants (leaves, buds, flowers, fruit seeds etc)

  • Solo hikers that waddle and have a tendency to freeze when threatened

  • Only breed when Rimu trees put out masses of fruit – every two to four years

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Source: Department of Conservation

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MĀUI DOLPHIN

NZ Status: Endemic (only found in NZ)

Population: Between 60 over the age of 1 year

Conservation Status (NZTCS): Threatened - Nationally Critical

Found: West coast of the North Island from Maunganui Bluff to Whanganui 

Habitat: Found close to shore

Threats: Fishing, disease, oil and gas exploration, boat strike, mining, tourism, noise

 

Facts:

  • World’s smallest and rarest dolphin

  • Have distinctive grey, white and black markings and short snout

  • Live up to 20 years old

  • “See” with sound, by sending out high frequency clicks that bounce off surrounding objects 

  • Look similar to the Hector’s dolphin – but are physically and genetically different

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Source: Department of Conservation

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NZ SEA LION

NZ Status: Endemic (only found in NZ)

Population: About 12,000

Conservation Status (NZTCS): Threatened - Nationally Vulnerable

Found: Auckland and Campbell subantarctic islands. Emerging breeding locations at Stewart Island/Rakiura, Otago and Southland regions

Habitat: Sandy beaches and rocks. Breeding females seek shelter inland 

Threats: Diseases, fisheries interactions, food availability, human impacts

 

Facts:

  • New Zealand sea lions are one of the rarest sea lion species in the world

  • Main breeding colony in decline

  • Have blunt nose and short whiskers

  • Live up to 23 years

  • Males have a defined mane around their shoulders and are a dark brown/black colour

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Source: Department of Conservation

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FIORDLAND CRESTED PENGUIN

NZ Status: Endemic (only found in NZ)

Population: Between 2,500 and 3,000

Conservation Status (NZTCS): Threatened - Nationally Vulnerable

Found: South Westland, Fiordland, Solander Island, Codfish and Stewart Island etc

Habitat: Dense coastal shrub, sea caves, rocks, creating nests in hollows under fallen trees, roots, boulders or rock crevices

Threats: Dogs, human disturbance, climate changes

Facts:

  • Māori name is Tawaki

  • One of the rarest NZ mainland penguins

  • Lay two eggs – the first chick is smaller than the second, and they are laid 3-6 days apart

  • Live for 15-20 years

  • Some grow barnacles on their tails, which indicates they are at sea for long periods of time

 
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Source: Department of Conservation

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HAMILTON’S FROG

NZ Status: Endemic

Population: 40,000

Conservation Status (NZTCS): Threatened – Nationally Vulnerable

Found: Stephens Island on the Cook Strait

Habitat: Live under large rocks and crevices in moist forest

Threats: Disease and predation

 

Facts:

  • One of the worlds most endangered frogs

  • Less than 300 individuals remaining 

  • Small reaching only 52mm in length

  • Difficult to see as they camouflage themselves into their surroundings

  • Don’t croak very often like most frogs

 
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Source: Department of Conservation

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TUATARA

NZ Status: Endemic (only found in NZ)

Population: Estimated 60,000

Conservation Status (NZTCS): At Risk - Relict (stabilising after decline)

Found: Offshore islands, mainland sanctuaries

Habitat: Live in burrows that are often shared with birds

Threats: Predation and low genetic diversity

Facts:

  • Last survivors of reptiles that thrived in the age of Dinosaurs

  • Eat invertebrates: beetles, Weta, worms, spiders

  • Live between 60 and 100 years

  • Tuatara means 'peaks on the back' in Māori

  • They are most famous for their 'third eye' on the top centre of their head which functions as a light sensor

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Source: Department of Conservation

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FOREST GECKO

NZ Status: Endemic

Population: Unknown

Conservation Status (NZTCS): At Risk - Declining

Found: Northland, Auckland, Marlborough Sounds, West Coast

Habitat: During the day they tend to hide in tree hollows, under logs, stones or bark

Threats: Predation from mammals

 

Facts:

  • 39 species of Gecko in NZ

  • Mainly nocturnal (active at night) or crepuscular (active at dawn and dusk)

  • Live up to 20 years

  • Every year geckos shed old skin in a process known as 'sloughing'

  • Colour: grey/brown or green/brown and have markings along their back which helps blend into their habitat of forest and shrub

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